​​Corn Production & Pursuit of Maximum Yield (Part 2)

August 2012 | 40 min., 53 sec.
by Roger W. Elmore
Iowa State University

Summary

​Part 2 of this two-part presentation helps consultants, growers, and other practitioners specifically in the North Central U.S. but has implications for anyone interested in maximizing corn yield. The presentation discusses impacts of hybrid choice, plant population, planting date, row spacing, and crop rotation on yield. In addition, it addresses some factors limiting yield. Part 2 presents data from National Corn Grower Association Corn Yield Contest winners and recent management from Iowa State University as a framework for the discussion. At the end of this presentation, viewers will understand the importance of optimum crop management practices in maximizing yield and consider the promises and challenges of reaching a national average of 300 bushels per acre by 2030.

About the Presenter

Roger W. ElmoreRoger W. Elmore is an Extension Corn Specialist and Professor of Agronomy at Iowa State University. He concentrates on development of practical management information for corn growers. He strives to do his best to maintain or increase profitability of farming by seeking and demonstrating environmentally sound production practices. After earning his undergraduate degree, Roger was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Malaysia, where he worked with a crop diversification program in paddy rice-based cropping systems. He was employed with the University of Nebraska for 24 years and worked largely with cultural practices for irrigated corn and soybean systems with some additional projects on winter wheat and grain sorghum.​

Contact Information:
Email: relmore@iastate.edu

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