​​Potential Impact of Contamination

July 2017 | 15 min., 47 sec.
by Greg Holt
USDA-ARS

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Summary

​This presentation presents research conducted by CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) and USDA-ARS personnel to access the potential impact that plastic contamination in a lint bale can have on the final product. In this study, a 227 kg (500 lb) bale of lint was spiked with 6 g of plastic bale wrap and processed through a commercial textile mill to determine the effect on yarn and fabric processing performance. The first portion of this talk defines the background and setup for the study. The second portion discusses the results as well as future studies based on findings.

About the Presenter

Greg HoltGreg Holt is an Agricultural Engineer and Research Leader of the Cotton Production and Processing Research Unit in Lubbock, Texas. He completed undergraduate and master’s degrees in Agricultural Engineering at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas, and his PhD in Industrial Engineering from Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas. Dr. Holt joined ARS in 1998, and leads a team of engineers addressing issues facing cotton breeders, producers, ginners, and spinners. The five main areas of research for the Unit include: 1) Preservation of fiber quality, 2) Cotton harvester improvements, 3) Ginning processes and machinery development, 4) Quantification of particulate matter emissions from agricultural sources, 5) Value-added processing of agricultural substrates. Plastic contamination detection and removal is a component of the ginning processes research of the Unit.​

Contact Information:
Email: Greg.Holt@ars.usda.gov

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